aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/block/kyber-iosched.c
Commit message (Collapse)AuthorAgeFilesLines
* block: switch all files cleared marked as GPLv2 to SPDX tagsChristoph Hellwig2019-04-301-12/+1
| | | | | | | | | All these files have some form of the usual GPLv2 boilerplate. Switch them to use SPDX tags instead. Reviewed-by: Chaitanya Kulkarni <chaitanya.kulkarni@wdc.com> Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: use sbitmap add_wait_queue/list_del wait helpersJens Axboe2018-12-201-13/+15
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | sbq_wake_ptr() checks sbq->ws_active to know if it needs to loop the wait indexes or not. This requires the use of the sbitmap waitqueue wrappers, but kyber doesn't use those for its domain token waitqueue handling. Convert kyber to use the helpers. This fixes a hang with waiting for domain tokens. Fixes: 5d2ee7122c73 ("sbitmap: optimize wakeup check") Tested-by: Ming Lei <ming.lei@redhat.com> Reported-by: Ming Lei <ming.lei@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* blk-mq: allow software queue to map to multiple hardware queuesJens Axboe2018-11-071-3/+3
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | The mapping used to be dependent on just the CPU location, but now it's a tuple of (type, cpu) instead. This is a prep patch for allowing a single software queue to map to multiple hardware queues. No functional changes in this patch. This changes the software queue count to an unsigned short to save a bit of space. We can still support 64K-1 CPUs, which should be enough. Add a check to catch a wrap. Reviewed-by: Hannes Reinecke <hare@suse.com> Reviewed-by: Keith Busch <keith.busch@intel.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: get rid of MQ scheduler ops unionJens Axboe2018-11-071-1/+1
| | | | | | | | This is a remnant of when we had ops for both SQ and MQ schedulers. Now it's just MQ, so get rid of the union. Reviewed-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: remove dead elevator codeJens Axboe2018-11-071-1/+0
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | This removes a bunch of core and elevator related code. On the core front, we remove anything related to queue running, draining, initialization, plugging, and congestions. We also kill anything related to request allocation, merging, retrieval, and completion. Remove any checking for single queue IO schedulers, as they no longer exist. This means we can also delete a bunch of code related to request issue, adding, completion, etc - and all the SQ related ops and helpers. Also kill the load_default_modules(), as all that did was provide for a way to load the default single queue elevator. Tested-by: Ming Lei <ming.lei@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: fix integer overflow of latency targets on 32-bitOmar Sandoval2018-09-281-3/+3
| | | | | | | | | | | | NSEC_PER_SEC has type long, so 5 * NSEC_PER_SEC is calculated as a long. However, 5 seconds is 5,000,000,000 nanoseconds, which overflows a 32-bit long. Make sure all of the targets are calculated as 64-bit values. Fixes: 6e25cb01ea20 ("kyber: implement improved heuristics") Reported-by: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au> Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: add tracepointsOmar Sandoval2018-09-271-18/+34
| | | | | | | | | | When debugging Kyber, it's really useful to know what latencies we've been having, how the domain depths have been adjusted, and if we've actually been throttling. Add three tracepoints, kyber_latency, kyber_adjust, and kyber_throttled, to record that. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: implement improved heuristicsOmar Sandoval2018-09-271-218/+279
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Kyber's current heuristics have a few flaws: - It's based on the mean latency, but p99 latency tends to be more meaningful to anyone who cares about latency. The mean can also be skewed by rare outliers that the scheduler can't do anything about. - The statistics calculations are purely time-based with a short window. This works for steady, high load, but is more sensitive to outliers with bursty workloads. - It only considers the latency once an I/O has been submitted to the device, but the user cares about the time spent in the kernel, as well. These are shortcomings of the generic blk-stat code which doesn't quite fit the ideal use case for Kyber. So, this replaces the statistics with a histogram used to calculate percentiles of total latency and I/O latency, which we then use to adjust depths in a slightly more intelligent manner: - Sync and async writes are now the same domain. - Discards are a separate domain. - Domain queue depths are scaled by the ratio of the p99 total latency to the target latency (e.g., if the p99 latency is double the target latency, we will double the queue depth; if the p99 latency is half of the target latency, we can halve the queue depth). - We use the I/O latency to determine whether we should scale queue depths down: we will only scale down if any domain's I/O latency exceeds the target latency, which is an indicator of congestion in the device. These new heuristics are just as scalable as the heuristics they replace. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: don't make domain token sbitmap larger than necessaryOmar Sandoval2018-09-271-13/+2
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | The domain token sbitmaps are currently initialized to the device queue depth or 256, whichever is larger, and immediately resized to the maximum depth for that domain (256, 128, or 64 for read, write, and other, respectively). The sbitmap is never resized larger than that, so it's unnecessary to allocate a bitmap larger than the maximum depth. Let's just allocate it to the maximum depth to begin with. This will use marginally less memory, and more importantly, give us a more appropriate number of bits per sbitmap word. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: move call of scheduler's ->completed_request() hookOmar Sandoval2018-09-271-3/+2
| | | | | | | | | | Commit 4bc6339a583c ("block: move blk_stat_add() to __blk_mq_end_request()") consolidated some calls using ktime_get() so we'd only need to call it once. Kyber's ->completed_request() hook also calls ktime_get(), so let's move it to the same place, too. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: kyber: make kyber more friendly with mergingJianchao Wang2018-05-301-32/+158
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Currently, kyber is very unfriendly with merging. kyber depends on ctx rq_list to do merging, however, most of time, it will not leave any requests in ctx rq_list. This is because even if tokens of one domain is used up, kyber will try to dispatch requests from other domain and flush the rq_list there. To improve this, we setup kyber_ctx_queue (kcq) which is similar with ctx, but it has rq_lists for different domain and build same mapping between kcq and khd as the ctx & hctx. Then we could merge, insert and dispatch for different domains separately. At the same time, only flush the rq_list of kcq when get domain token successfully. Then if one domain token is used up, the requests could be left in the rq_list of that domain and maybe merged with following io. Following is my test result on machine with 8 cores and NVMe card INTEL SSDPEKKR128G7 fio size=256m ioengine=libaio iodepth=64 direct=1 numjobs=8 seq/random +------+---------------------------------------------------------------+ |patch?| bw(MB/s) | iops | slat(usec) | clat(usec) | merge | +----------------------------------------------------------------------+ | w/o | 606/612 | 151k/153k | 6.89/7.03 | 3349.21/3305.40 | 0/0 | +----------------------------------------------------------------------+ | w/ | 1083/616 | 277k/154k | 4.93/6.95 | 1830.62/3279.95 | 223k/3k | +----------------------------------------------------------------------+ When set numjobs to 16, the bw and iops could reach 1662MB/s and 425k on my platform. Signed-off-by: Jianchao Wang <jianchao.w.wang@oracle.com> Tested-by: Holger Hoffstätte <holger@applied-asynchrony.com> Reviewed-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber-iosched: update shallow depth when setting up hardware queueJens Axboe2018-05-101-0/+3
| | | | | | | | | | We don't expect the async depth to be smaller than the wake batch count for sbitmap, but just in case, inform sbitmap of what shallow depth kyber may use. Acked-by: Paolo Valente <paolo.valente@linaro.org> Reviewed-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: get rid of struct blk_issue_statOmar Sandoval2018-05-091-3/+3
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | struct blk_issue_stat squashes three things into one u64: - The time the driver started working on a request - The original size of the request (for the io.low controller) - Flags for writeback throttling It turns out that on x86_64, we have a 4 byte hole in struct request which we can fill with the non-timestamp fields from blk_issue_stat, simplifying things quite a bit. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: kyber: fix domain token leak during requeueMing Lei2018-02-241-0/+1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | When requeuing request, the domain token should have been freed before re-inserting the request to io scheduler. Otherwise, the assigned domain token will be leaked, and IO hang can be caused. Cc: Paolo Valente <paolo.valente@linaro.org> Cc: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org Reviewed-by: Bart Van Assche <bart.vanassche@wdc.com> Signed-off-by: Ming Lei <ming.lei@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: fix another domain token wait queue hangOmar Sandoval2017-12-061-13/+24
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Commit 8cf466602028 ("kyber: fix hang on domain token wait queue") fixed a hang caused by leaving wait entries on the domain token wait queue after the __sbitmap_queue_get() retry succeeded, making that wait entry a "dud" which won't in turn wake more entries up. However, we can also get a dud entry if kyber_get_domain_token() fails once but is then called again and succeeds. This can happen if the hardware queue is rerun for some other reason, or, more likely, kyber_dispatch_request() tries the same domain twice. The fix is to remove our entry from the wait queue whenever we successfully get a token. The only complication is that we might be on one of many wait queues in the struct sbitmap_queue, but that's easily fixed by remembering which wait queue we were put on. While we're here, only initialize the wait queue entry once instead of on every wait, and use spin_lock_irq() instead of spin_lock_irqsave(), since this is always called from process context with irqs enabled. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* block: kyber: check if there are requests in ctx in kyber_has_work()Ming Lei2017-11-011-1/+1
| | | | | | | | There may be request in sw queue, and not fetched to domain queue yet, so check it in kyber_has_work(). Signed-off-by: Ming Lei <ming.lei@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: fix hang on domain token wait queueOmar Sandoval2017-10-171-1/+9
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | When we're getting a domain token, if we fail to get a token on our first attempt, we put the current hardware queue on a wait queue and then try again just in case a token was freed after our initial attempt but before we got on the wait queue. If this second attempt succeeds, we currently leave the hardware queue on the wait queue. Usually this is okay; we'll just run the hardware queue one extra time when another token is freed. However, if the hardware queue doesn't have any other requests waiting, then when it it gets the extra wakeup, it won't have anything to free and therefore won't wake up any other hardware queues. If tokens are limited, then we won't make forward progress and the device will hang. Reported-by: Bin Zha <zhabin.zb@alibaba-inc.com> Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* Merge branch 'sched-core-for-linus' of ↵Linus Torvalds2017-07-031-8/+8
|\ | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip Pull scheduler updates from Ingo Molnar: "The main changes in this cycle were: - Add the SYSTEM_SCHEDULING bootup state to move various scheduler debug checks earlier into the bootup. This turns silent and sporadically deadly bugs into nice, deterministic splats. Fix some of the splats that triggered. (Thomas Gleixner) - A round of restructuring and refactoring of the load-balancing and topology code (Peter Zijlstra) - Another round of consolidating ~20 of incremental scheduler code history: this time in terms of wait-queue nomenclature. (I didn't get much feedback on these renaming patches, and we can still easily change any names I might have misplaced, so if anyone hates a new name, please holler and I'll fix it.) (Ingo Molnar) - sched/numa improvements, fixes and updates (Rik van Riel) - Another round of x86/tsc scheduler clock code improvements, in hope of making it more robust (Peter Zijlstra) - Improve NOHZ behavior (Frederic Weisbecker) - Deadline scheduler improvements and fixes (Luca Abeni, Daniel Bristot de Oliveira) - Simplify and optimize the topology setup code (Lauro Ramos Venancio) - Debloat and decouple scheduler code some more (Nicolas Pitre) - Simplify code by making better use of llist primitives (Byungchul Park) - ... plus other fixes and improvements" * 'sched-core-for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip: (103 commits) sched/cputime: Refactor the cputime_adjust() code sched/debug: Expose the number of RT/DL tasks that can migrate sched/numa: Hide numa_wake_affine() from UP build sched/fair: Remove effective_load() sched/numa: Implement NUMA node level wake_affine() sched/fair: Simplify wake_affine() for the single socket case sched/numa: Override part of migrate_degrades_locality() when idle balancing sched/rt: Move RT related code from sched/core.c to sched/rt.c sched/deadline: Move DL related code from sched/core.c to sched/deadline.c sched/cpuset: Only offer CONFIG_CPUSETS if SMP is enabled sched/fair: Spare idle load balancing on nohz_full CPUs nohz: Move idle balancer registration to the idle path sched/loadavg: Generalize "_idle" naming to "_nohz" sched/core: Drop the unused try_get_task_struct() helper function sched/fair: WARN() and refuse to set buddy when !se->on_rq sched/debug: Fix SCHED_WARN_ON() to return a value on !CONFIG_SCHED_DEBUG as well sched/wait: Disambiguate wq_entry->task_list and wq_head->task_list naming sched/wait: Move bit_wait_table[] and related functionality from sched/core.c to sched/wait_bit.c sched/wait: Split out the wait_bit*() APIs from <linux/wait.h> into <linux/wait_bit.h> sched/wait: Re-adjust macro line continuation backslashes in <linux/wait.h> ...
| * sched/wait: Disambiguate wq_entry->task_list and wq_head->task_list namingIngo Molnar2017-06-201-4/+4
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | So I've noticed a number of instances where it was not obvious from the code whether ->task_list was for a wait-queue head or a wait-queue entry. Furthermore, there's a number of wait-queue users where the lists are not for 'tasks' but other entities (poll tables, etc.), in which case the 'task_list' name is actively confusing. To clear this all up, name the wait-queue head and entry list structure fields unambiguously: struct wait_queue_head::task_list => ::head struct wait_queue_entry::task_list => ::entry For example, this code: rqw->wait.task_list.next != &wait->task_list ... is was pretty unclear (to me) what it's doing, while now it's written this way: rqw->wait.head.next != &wait->entry ... which makes it pretty clear that we are iterating a list until we see the head. Other examples are: list_for_each_entry_safe(pos, next, &x->task_list, task_list) { list_for_each_entry(wq, &fence->wait.task_list, task_list) { ... where it's unclear (to me) what we are iterating, and during review it's hard to tell whether it's trying to walk a wait-queue entry (which would be a bug), while now it's written as: list_for_each_entry_safe(pos, next, &x->head, entry) { list_for_each_entry(wq, &fence->wait.head, entry) { Cc: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
| * sched/wait: Rename wait_queue_t => wait_queue_entry_tIngo Molnar2017-06-201-4/+4
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Rename: wait_queue_t => wait_queue_entry_t 'wait_queue_t' was always a slight misnomer: its name implies that it's a "queue", but in reality it's a queue *entry*. The 'real' queue is the wait queue head, which had to carry the name. Start sorting this out by renaming it to 'wait_queue_entry_t'. This also allows the real structure name 'struct __wait_queue' to lose its double underscore and become 'struct wait_queue_entry', which is the more canonical nomenclature for such data types. Cc: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de> Cc: linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
* | blk-mq-sched: unify request prepare methodsChristoph Hellwig2017-06-181-12/+11
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | This patch makes sure we always allocate requests in the core blk-mq code and use a common prepare_request method to initialize them for both mq I/O schedulers. For Kyber and additional limit_depth method is added that is called before allocating the request. Also because none of the intializations can really fail the new method does not return an error - instead the bfq finish method is hardened to deal with the no-IOC case. Last but not least this removes the abuse of RQF_QUEUE by the blk-mq scheduling code as RQF_ELFPRIV is all that is needed now. Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* | blk-mq-sched: unify request finished methodsChristoph Hellwig2017-06-181-5/+3
|/ | | | | | | No need to have two different callouts of bfq vs kyber. Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
* kyber: add debugfs attributesOmar Sandoval2017-05-041-0/+130
| | | | | | | | | Expose the domain token pools, asynchronous sbitmap depth, domain request lists, and batching state. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Reviewed-by: Hannes Reinecke <hare@suse.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@fb.com>
* blk-stat: convert blk-stat bucket callback to signedStephen Bates2017-04-201-1/+1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | In order to allow for filtering of IO based on some other properties of the request than direction we allow the bucket function to return an int. If the bucket callback returns a negative do no count it in the stats accumulation. Signed-off-by: Stephen Bates <sbates@raithlin.com> Fixed up Kyber scheduler stat callback. Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@fb.com>
* blk-mq: introduce Kyber multiqueue I/O schedulerOmar Sandoval2017-04-141-0/+719
The Kyber I/O scheduler is an I/O scheduler for fast devices designed to scale to multiple queues. Users configure only two knobs, the target read and synchronous write latencies, and the scheduler tunes itself to achieve that latency goal. The implementation is based on "tokens", built on top of the scalable bitmap library. Tokens serve as a mechanism for limiting requests. There are two tiers of tokens: queueing tokens and dispatch tokens. A queueing token is required to allocate a request. In fact, these tokens are actually the blk-mq internal scheduler tags, but the scheduler manages the allocation directly in order to implement its policy. Dispatch tokens are device-wide and split up into two scheduling domains: reads vs. writes. Each hardware queue dispatches batches round-robin between the scheduling domains as long as tokens are available for that domain. These tokens can be used as the mechanism to enable various policies. The policy Kyber uses is inspired by active queue management techniques for network routing, similar to blk-wbt. The scheduler monitors latencies and scales the number of dispatch tokens accordingly. Queueing tokens are used to prevent starvation of synchronous requests by asynchronous requests. Various extensions are possible, including better heuristics and ionice support. The new scheduler isn't set as the default yet. Signed-off-by: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com> Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@fb.com>